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Archive for the ‘Wild meat’ Category

Since March, G and I have decided only to eat wild meat and fish for the remainder of the time we’re living in Hay River. It’s been marvelously delicious, and really neat to hear people’s stories about their favourite recipes for different meats and for different times of the year. We’ve got a lovey friend and her family who lives across the river and loves to spoil us and share her traditional culture with us through food, language, sewing and endless stories. She’s an excellent story-teller, and constantly gives her time and energy to the community. She also loves to share her food with us, and a few weeks ago she gave us a nice rack of moose ribs along with a couple that she had recently smoked. “Make pulled moose meat” she told me, with a big smile. So I set out to find a recipe I thought did justice to the meat, and planned to eat this on a Monday. An emergency called us out just as we were about to begin cooking, so the meal was post-poned one day and it marinated overnight. It was a happy coincidence, because Tuesday we had a good reason to celebrate, and this meal was just the perfect touch.

I built the recipe from one published by the Temiskaming Shores Fishing and Angling Association, converting it somewhat to what I found in the fridge and the bush on a walk the day we made it: juniper berries and labrador tea leaves.

I’m sure this recipe would work well with other meats as well, but if you have access to moose I highly recommend it.

Pulled Moose

Ingredients

3 Tbsp paprika

4 cloves garlic, minced

1 Tbsp dry mustard

1/2 tsp salt

8 juniper berries

2 Tbsp maple syrup

1 cup labrador tea, leaves removed

1 cup barbecue sauce

2 cups mushroom broth

2 smoked moose ribs

3 lb moose ribs

Directions

Boil the smoked ribs for 20 minutes and then drain. Mix the first 5 ingredients in a bowl to make the rub. Wash the ribs and coat both the raw and the smoked ribs in the rub. Refrigerate and leave covered for a night.

The following day, warm up the stock, tea, barbecue sauce and the maple syrup until simmering. Place moose ribs into slow cooker and cover with broth.

Cook on low for 6-8 hours. While the meat is warm, pull shreds of the tender meat off the bone using a fork. Pour sauce over meat and serve with toasted buns or mashed potatoes!

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Fish Stir-Fry

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to go ice fishing with a local fisherman who showed us how to set nets under 4.5 feet of ice, which blew my mind. After we brought the nets in, I watched him fillet at least two dozen large fish, of four or five varieties. I’m looking forward to fishing myself, and attempting to fillet the fish after what I learned – I assume it will be a lot sloppier and slower, but I’m ready for the challenge!

After we fished we ate an absolutely delicious meal of sashimi, pan-fried fish with dill, and bannock in one of his cabins out on the lake. I have never had such fresh sashimi!

We ate so much fish, and yet there were many left-overs. We brought many different types home, including the left-over sashimi fillets which we turned into this delicious stir-fry for lunch the following day. This stir-fry is amazing not only because it’s delicious but because it is also incredibly fast and simple!

Heading out for fishing

Ingredients – 2 servings

1 lb fish fillets, sliced into strips

2 green onions, chopped

1 carrot, cut into match sticks

1 zucchini, halved and then finely sliced

1 clove garlic, minced

1 Tbsp oil

1/2 lemon, juiced

Soy sauce

Salt and pepper to taste

Rice, cooked

Directions

Slice, dice, and prepare all stir-fry ingredients. Heat oil in pan over medium-high heat, then add garlic. Stir, then add the fish. Saute on medium for a few minutes, then add the remaining veggies. Continue to stir often, and cook for about 6 minutes until the fish is cooked and the veggies are still crunchy but hot. Season with salt and pepper and soy sauce.

Serve the fish stir-fry over rice with soy sauce.

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Muskox burger

I’ve been saving photos of many things for Gourm(eh) in the past month. Life up North has been ever-consuming, and I was waiting for a window during which I could start posting. Since we started up Gourm(eh), we’ve been trying to explore Canadian cuisine. We’ve posted traditional dishes and others from almost each continent. I think that really points to how wonderfully multi-cultural our country is, and I must say I really enjoy that fact.

During my stay up in Hay River, I think I finally have learned a little more about Canadian cuisine. As a small northern community (although large for the territories), pot-lucks, dinners, the market and cooking clubs with kids at the school have shown me several new secrets about Canadian food. Here, if it contains meat (wild or store-bought) and it sticks to your ribs it is good, keeping you fuelled through the cold and dark months. It’s pretty much “no meat, no good” in the families that have been here for generations. An influx of new folks has started to change up the tastes in town (including Chinese and vegetarian), but those are not yet mixed into the norm, from my observation.

One pleasure I’ve had has been to explore wild meats here. I am always asking the kids stories about hunting with their families, talking with elders about how they lived on the land. It’s fascinating, and every story involves new and interesting information I’m still not sure how to fit together. It’s also been fun trying all the different wild meats common around here, from Bison to Caribou and Fish. Last week, we made these Muskox burgers which were unbelievably delicious. Muskox has its own unique flavour, and is totally lean. The afternoon before we cooked them, I happened to hear some advice from a child’s mother: include oats and eggs or else they will fall apart the meat is so crumbly!

The most surprising thing about Muskox is that even though we always buy extra lean ground beef, I’m used to my burgers and meatballs shrinking. With Muskox meat, we shaped burgers into medium-sized patties hoping to end up with small patties, as we do with beef. This time, though, the patties did not shrink at all, leaving us with exactly the same volume as we began with. If you’re a meat-eater, I highly recommend trying Muskox if you ever have the opportunity!

Muskox feast

Muskox burgers – (5)

Ingredients

1 lb ground Muskox meat

1/2 cup instant oats

1 leek, white and light green only, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tsp crushed rosemary

1/2 tsp cracked black pepper

1-2 eggs (depending on how crumbly the mixture is)

5 buns (I like to make bannock buns)

Suggested toppings

5 lettuce leaves, washed

1 tomato, sliced

Cheddar slices

Dijon mustard

Caramelized leeks (optional)

Directions

In a bowl, pat dry the muskox meat as best you can. Mix the ground meat up with your hands. Add all the additional ingredients except the egg. Mix well, and once it is evenly mixed, add the egg. Form the mixture into patties and cook as you would a burger.

Serve on freshly baked bannock buns with any of the toppings you enjoy!

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