Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘loaf’

Sourdoughbread1

Since I was a little girl I loved eating fresh sourdough bread with butter, but I always felt like it was not something I could ever do from scratch – and I mean really from scratch.

Somehow, with a lot of love and flour, we’ve managed just that: make sourdough bread from scratch through the sourdough bootcamp, without any added yeast, and the result was absolutely amazing.

Follow the sourdough bootcamp instructions to get your sourdough starter, or obtain some from a crazy friend. Just make sure you give yourself a couple of days to complete this recipe, and if you observe your dough, you will not be disappointed. What I mean by observe is to be mindful of its behaviour and its texture as you work with it. Sourdough is not as easy as regular yeast, and it requires you to get a feel for what it likes. That said, once you start getting familiar with its quirks, it gets really fun!

Sourdough boules

Ingredients

1/2 cup sourdough starter

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup warm water

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 cups warm water

2 Tbsp maple syrup

2 cups all-purpose flour plus one cup flour

1 cup quick oats

1 1/2 Tbsp salt

Directions

Day 1: morning

Feed the starter with 1 cup each flour and water. Let rest in a warm place for 8-12 hours.

Day 1: evening

Return 1/2 cup starter to the fridge. To remaining starter add 2 cups each flour and water. Cover loosely and let rest all night. This forms what is called the ‘sponge’ – it forms the basis of your bread tomorrow.

Day 2: morning

Your now bubbly and yeasty sponge needs:

2 Tbsp maple syrup, 2 cups flour and water, and 1 cup rolled oats. Stir it all in, and gradually add in the reserved cup of flour until you can’t stir with a spoon any longer. Dust hands and working surface with flour, and keep dusted throughout. Turn dough out onto floured surface and knead for a few minutes, working the remaining flour in. Use the following kneading instructions from the Boreal Gourmet Cookbook:

“Draw the edges into the centre, fold the dough in half, press the seam closed with the heel of your hand, push the dough away from you, give it a quarter turn, and repeat”. I tend to knead this portion by hand for about 10 minutes. After that, reflour the surface and place the dough on top for a 20-minute rest, covered with a damp towel.

Once it has rested, resume kneading, this time incorporating the salt little by little. I know the amount of salt seems large but it’s important, and I’m already reducing the salt content compared to the original.

Once you have finished kneading for about 6-8 more minutes, split the dough in half and form it into boules or rectangular loaves. To form the boule, work your hands around the round loaf, pulling the edges in and pinching them in the centre. Let them rest in a parchment-paper lined bowl covered with a damp towel. To fit it into a rectangular pan, flatten the ball and fold both edges in, tuck the ends in and pinch it all shut. Place the seam on the bottom of an oiled pan.

Cover the top with a light brush of oil and a damp towel. Let rest until doubled in volume, around 4 hours. Place the boules on a baking tray in their parchment paper, and leave the rectangular loaves in their rectangular pans. When ready, use a sharp knife to cut an “X” in the round boules or several slashes in the rectangular loaves. Preheat the oven to 450F and put a pot of boiling water in the oven. When the oven is hot, place both loaves inside. Bake for 10 minutes, then remove the pan of water and bake for another 10 minutes. After that, crack the door open and maintain it that way for 5-10 more minutes to brown the loaves (keep a tight eye to make sure it doesn’t brown too much!).

When ready, remove the bread from the baking sheets/pans and cool on a wire rack. Wait until bread is cool for it to maintain its quality! Serve with soft butter to accompany whatever you like! A personal favourite is smoked fish… Enjoy!

 

Read Full Post »