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Posts Tagged ‘snack’

One thing we do not lack for in medicine is exams.  As such, finding ways to make studying more exciting is a constant occupation.  Somehow carrot sticks just don’t aways cut it.  A surefire way to liven up any study session is cupcakes.  Who doesn’t love cupcakes?  They are the perfect sugar boost in anyone’s day – especially when covered in delicious chocolate icing!

This particular study session happened to fall on my cousin’s birthday, so to make them more fun, I decided to add sprinkles to a Martha Stewart Recipe.  The chocolate buttercream icing is a time-tested family recipe.  I suspect the confetti will be a regular addition to my future cupcake baking adventures 🙂

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Vanilla Confetti Cupcakes with Chocolate Buttercream Icing

(Makes 24 cupcakes)

 

Ingredients

Vanilla Confetti Cupcakes

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

3/4 teaspoon salt

12 tablespoons (or 3/4 cup) unsalted butter, room temperature

1 1/2 cups sugar

4 large eggs

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1 1/4 cups milk

Multicoloured sprinkles

 

Chocolate Buttercream Icing

3ish tablespoons butter, room temperature

3 or 4 tablespoons of cocoa powder

2-3 tablespoons of cold coffee (the stronger, the tastier)

A lot of icing sugar

 

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line cupcake pan with liners; set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. In a large mixing bowl, cream together butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing until incorporated; scrape down sides of bowl, and beat in vanilla.

Add flour mixture and milk alternately, beginning and ending with flour. Scrape down sides and bottom of bowl.  Add as many sprinkles as you desire (I used about 1/4 cup).

Divide batter evenly among liners, filling each about three-quarters full. Bake until tops spring back when touched, about 20 minutes, rotating pan once if needed. Transfer to a wire rack; let cool for 5 minutes. Remove cupcakes from pan, and let cool completely on wire rack.

Meanwhile, make the icing. Cream together the butter, cocoa powder, and coffee.  Incorporate icing sugar until chocolate-mocha icing is thick, yet spreadable.

When the cupcakes are cool, generally frost with the chocolate buttercream icing.  Top with a few extra sprinkles.  Delicious with a cold glass of milk!

– Catherine

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One of my favourite things to go home to after a long day of work is to have a cup of tea in a quiet house, especially when the snow has already begun and winter is fast approaching. Baking some cookies can do the trick too, which I did yesterday. Without any cookbooks or internet at my disposal yesterday, I was left to my own devices, which included a jar of peanut butter (no recipe on that label), some butter, sugar, flour, and… jam! I love thumbprint cookies with jam, so why not take the old PB&J sandwich to the next course, and turn it into a dessert? The result was delicious!

Now that the snow has begun, I just wish I could bake cookies every day when I come home.

Ingredients:

-1/2 cup brown sugar

-1/4 cup soft butter

-1 egg

-1/2 cup peanut butter (I like the “just peanuts” kind)

-1 cup flour

-1/2 cup quick-cooking oats

-1 tsp baking powder

-pinch salt

-strawberry or raspberry (my favourite!) jam

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375F. In a medium bowl cream the butter and sugar together, and then add egg and peanut butter. Stir until mixture is smooth.

In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients well. Add peanut butter mixture, and mix in with your hands. Grease a cookie sheet. Place small balls of batter on sheet and make thumbprint hole inside. Fill with jam.
Bake for 15-18 minutes or until cooked but still a bit soft. Cool on a baking rack and serve with a glass of milk or hot-chocolate!

-Sitelle

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Several posts ago I wrote about peanut butter-based snacks. I love peanuts and peanut butter so much. Although there is a risk of peanuts carrying aflotoxin (you know, on those really gross-tasting peanuts), the Canadian food supply keeps them at acceptable levels. Peanuts were my dietary staple in The Gambia. I’d grab a bag of roasted peanuts on the road; I’d pick them in the fields with the women and we’d carry them home in big buckets on our heads; we’d hull them on raised concrete platforms with a nut in each hand which we’d whack on the concrete and remove from the shell, with a big pile between our knees that never seemed to end. Peanuts are the way of life there. I ate them every day.

To make peanut butter, simply roast your peanuts, squeeze them in your hands to remove skins when they have cooled, and then place them in a blender or food processor or food grinder and let it spin! The longer you go, the smoother it gets. Add a teaspoon or two full of vegetable oil if it is not liquid enough – that will depend on the variety of groundnut you have! Adding a pinch of salt will bring out the flavours more if you’re interested.

Upon my return, I’ve craved peanuts big time. Thanks to my lovely host families, I had a plentiful supply, despite my distance. I quite enjoyed roasting them and turning them into peanut butter, before they were transformed into the delicious snacks and meals which I’ve already started posting including the Domoda and the Chocolate Kickers, and this childhood favourite snack of mine, these peanut butter logs.

Ingredients – three 4-inch logs (approximately)

1 cup peanut butter (I prefer the ‘just peanuts kind’, which you can buy or make yourself with a food processor or blender – simply follow the instructions under the picture)

4 Tbsp honey

5 Tbsp milk powder (or 7 Tbsp if instant), or more as needed

2-3 Tbsp desiccated coconut

Directions

Mix all ingredients together using a strong fork or whatever works for you. Place a third of the desiccated coconut on a sheet of parchment paper, and spread evenly. Form a third of the mixture into a log, and roll in the coconut. Place in parchment paper or wax paper and freeze.

Slice once frozen, and serve immediately for an energy-packed snack!

You can also add dried cranberries or mini chocolate chips for extra punch.

Hope you enjoy these!

-Sitelle

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There was no question in my head as to which snack I should prepare for a weekend of rock climbing in Kingston at the Kingston Mills. Co-incidentally, this snack is equally well suited to my most lovely co-blogger’s current occupation: successfully summiting Mount Kilimanjaro! (congrats girl, you rock!!).

So, as a tribute to our somewhat extreme activities these days, I thought I’d post one of my very favourite outdoors snack recipes, which is loaded in energy. Keeping a tupperware with a few of these delicious bites at the top of a daypack on a long canoe trip results in instant joy and energy, even at the prospect (and then the end) of a gruelling multi-kilometer portage. Just don’t risk forgetting it in there at night, as the animals are sure to come and feast if you allow them the opportunity!

The best thing about it, aside from its delicious taste and the amount of energy it packs in, is that it’s ridiculously easy to make, totally versatile, and will last as long as your trip (well, until supplies last!).

I originally found this recipe in the trailside cookbook, and this snack was called Chocolate Kickers. Since that fateful day where I first tried these I’ve taken the recipe and made a few changes, but it’s pretty much the same idea. It won’t take you more than 30 minutes to prepare, 15 of which are resting time. Ready? Go ahead, you’ll be done in no time. You probably can even make it at the camp site, but they’re so easy to make I’d just bring them fully made from home and keep the campsite cooking time for other delicious adventures like baked stuffed apples or blueberry pie.

Ingredients – makes about 20-25 bites of energy

3/4 cup confectioner’s sugar

1.5 cups crunchy peanutbutter

1 cup dark chocolate chips

2/3 cup powdered milk

1/2 cup to 1 cup dried cranberries or desiccated coconut

1-2 Tbsp water (approximately)

Directions

Put all ingredients together in a bowl. Mix well with two forks and probably your hands. Shape into bite-sized balls or press to 2/3 inch thick sheet and cut out with your favourite cookie cutter.

Let the chocolate kickers rest for 15 minutes, then pack into tupperware or airtight bags.

Hope you enjoy these!

-Sitelle

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As this post suggests, I am back! I must admit the fast pace of life throws me off a but here, as do all the choices availe in the super-market, and the orderly queues. Oh yeah, and Toronto feels so cold… apparently it is possible to acclimatize to new environments quite easily.

First of all I want to thank Catherine for all her wonderful contributions to Gourm(eh) while I was out of regular internet range. Catherine is alive and well in Kenya now (we traded continents, and spoke today!), and I am back in Canada. Now, it is my turn to share my west African adventures with you.

Actually, for the next little while I have many, many recipes I want to share: both Central America-inspired and Senegambia-inspired, and I hope you will enjoy them as much as I do. I find it exciting to try new styles of cooking, and each of these recipes has so many stories and memories attached I cannot help but be excited to post them!

Akara, or bean fritters, are very common throughout West Africa. I typically purchased them from women frying them on charcoal stoves along the streets who packaged them up in ripped brown paper from flour bags and doused them in spicy sauce. Resisting the urge to eat them right away, I would carry them home and eat them from the comfort of my mat while sharing them with my friends.

Ingredients

Akara

1.5 cups black-eyed peas, soaked in water overnight
1 large red onion
1 jalapeno or scotch bonnet hot pepper
6 black peppercorns
Salt to taste
Oil for frying
2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley (optional)

Dipping sauce

50g tomato paste
1 red onion finely sliced
2 cloves garlic finely chopped
2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped
juice of 1-2 lemons
1 tsp black pepper corns
2 Tbsp peanut oil
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup water

Directions

Soak beans overnight in plenty of water. The following day, squeeze or rub the skins off the beans (if a few remain, don’t worry), remove them by dumping the water out of the beans. Keep the beans in a large bowl and pass the water through a strainer to catch the skins. Add more water and continue to remove the skins and wash the beans.

Clean the onions and half the hot peppers in a food processor or blender with the beans and pulse. Pound the pepper corns and add to the mixture, and add the parsley if you want to add a bit of a unique taste. Pulse well, until a you have a thick bean paste. Add salt to taste and the remaining hot pepper if you want the fritters to be spicy (warning: scotch bonnet peppers are very, very spicy).

Heat up about a centimeter of oil in a pan with a lid over high heat. Once heat-waves show up on the oil reduce heat to medium high. Carefully add spoonfulls of the bean mixture into the hot oil. Test it with one first, and make sure to add more only when the oil is bubbling around the bean paste. Cook for a couple minutes on each side, then remove from the hot oil with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels.

Make Akara dipping sauce (spicy):

Dice the onions and garlic. Heat up the oil in a frying pan and add the onions and pounded black pepper. When the onions begin to become transparent, add the garlic and cook for another minute. Then stir in the tomato paste and cook for a couple more minutes before adding the chopped hot peppers and 1 cup water. Increase heat to medium-high until mixture boils, after which reduce the heat and simmer until at least half of the water has evaporated, and the sauce thickens. Add lemon juice and season with salt.

Pour sauce over fritters, and serve as an appetiser or main course with a salad.

Hope you enjoy them!

-Sitelle (Alias: Ya Ndey)

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I am sprinting to finish an initial completed draft of my thesis by the end of March (I’m over 100 pages with one and a half chapters to go…)  This sadly has left less time for culinary adventures, but it has motivated me to prepare delicious, yet nutricious snacks for long hours in my office.

I love crunching away on crisp veggies, and a tasty hummus only makes this snack more delectable.  The recipe below contains the blueprint of your basic hummus recipe – tweak the proportions of garlic, tahini, and lemon juice to chickpeas for your liking.  And then have fun with garnishes: my current favourite is a sprinkling of smoked paprika to give the hummus a little extra je ne sais quoi!

Hummus Dip

(makes about 2 cups)

 

Ingredients:

1 16 oz can chickpeas (garbanzo beans)

2 cloves of garlic, crushed

Juice from 1 lemon

1-2 tablespoons tahini

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions:

Drain chickpeas, reserving 1/4 cup of liquid. Combine all  ingredients in blender or food processor.  Blend for 2-4 minutes on low until the hummus is thoroughly mixed and smooth.

Serve immediately with your favourite garnish or cover and refridgerate.  The hummus keeps beautifully refridegerated for up to 1 week. Bon appetit!

Delicious garnishes  include: extra olive oil, a dash of cayenne, freshly shopped parsley, sprinkle of smoked paprika.

– Catherine

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The last time I made apple sauce was when I was about 10.  I was at my cottage for Thanksgiving.  My grandmother, having put the turkey in the oven, decided she needed some foliage to liven the table, so we went for a walk with a few of my cousins.  We happened across an apple tree along the side of the road.  Realizing that the only creature enjoying these apples were worms, we decided to pick a few. The apples, while fresh, were rather tart and slightly inedible.  Not to be deterred, my grandmother suggested we transform the apples into applesauce for our turkey dinner.  So we did, and it was delicious.

Last weekend, my department went apple picking in the Annapolis valley.  The sun was shining (dare I confess I got a sunburn in late September?) and the apples were crisp.  The trees were overflowing with ripe fruit, with countless varieties to choose among. I left with more apples than I knew what to do with.  While I’ve been enjoying an apple over lunch, I decided to recreate my memory of apple sauce.   Next up, perhaps a tarte tatin?

The apple sauce was a delight – especially with some blueberries and pecans mixed in.  I decided to sweeten it with Nova Scotia honey and spice it with cinnamon, ginger, and cloves.   I made it earlier this week, but after a bowl or two forgot about it.  When I tried it again 96 hours later, the apple flavours had really intensified.  So if you are more patient than me, I recommend letting it sit for a few hours before you dig into this snack.  Next time, I’ll make a larger batch and freeze half, so I can have delicious apple sauce on hand!

Apple Sauce

Ingredients:

Apples, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped (about 1-2 per serving)

Water

Honey

Your favourite spices (I used  about 2 teaspoons total of cinnamon, cloves, and ginger for six apples)

 

Directions:

Place the chopped apples into a large pot, and add enough water to cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 to 1 inch of water.  Bring to a boil.  Add a few tablespoons of honey (depending on the tartness of your apples and your desire for sweetness) and season with the spices.  Simmer over low heat until the apples have juiced up and are really soft, about 20-30 minutes.  Puree in a blender, until it reaches your desired texture.

Bon appetit!

-Catherine

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